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In 2008, Anand Jon Alexander, a rising star in the fashion design world, was convicted of multiple counts of sexual assault and received a life sentence in prison. He is widely believed to have been wrongfully convicted of these crimes.
As his petition for commutation filed by his attorneys notes, ‘Mr. Alexander’s tainted trial and unreliable verdict and subsequently disproportionate prison sentence has resulted in a travesty of justice.’
Jeffrey Deskovic, himself an exoneree and head of the Jeffrey Deskovic Foundation, told the Vanguard, ‘Anand Jon’s case is fraught with prosecutorial misconduct and bad lawyering. It is no wonder he was wrongfully convicted.’
In a letter, Mr. Deskovic, who will be the Vanguard’s keynote speaker in a few weeks, added, ‘I have never seen a wrongful conviction case as broad and complex as this one. It’s absolutely stunning!’
Similarly, having reviewed the evidence of factual innocence that was withheld by the police for over a decade, Exoneree Obie Anthony, founder of Exoneratednation.org, and former California Assemblywoman Patty Lopez, the author of Assembly Bill 1909, described the injustice against Anand Jon Alexander as ‘one of the worst cases of police misconduct…utterly shocking…poster boy victim of 1909 violations.’
Corey Parker, Counsel for American Justice Alliance, argues in his amicus curiae brief, ‘Unless this Court rectifies this wrongful conviction, minority groups and individuals in the State of California will live in fear of being subject to such similar state-sponsored discrimination and underhanded, unconstitutional tactics by the very law enforcement tasked with protecting them.’
Appellate Attorney Julia Anna Trant adds, ‘I am convinced that Mr. Alexander’s conviction is one of the worst miscarriages of justice I have ever encountered in my work as a legal professional. While working on Mr. Alexander’s case, I could not stop being astounded by the amount of violations of Mr. Alexander’s constitutional rights, the rules of criminal procedure, and the rules of evidence.’
While there are a number of complaints, including juror misconduct, Brady violations and police misconduct, a lesser-known but serious problem with his trial was the subtle but overt and egregious appeal to racial and religious prejudice.
In pretrial motions, the defense was able to get the judge to keep race and religion out of the case. However, they kept coming back in.
For instance, in a debate over whether a book would be admitted into evidence, the defense argued that ‘the court already said we’re keeping religion out of this case.’
During voir dire, Deputy DA Young noted, ‘I thought earlier when the court ruled we wouldn’t delve into religion, it wouldn’t touch on that area, so I didn’t object to it originally, but I thought it got into the moral, religious, spiritual areas we were trying to stay from.’
The judge noted, ‘I’m not going to permit it,’ and later clarified, ‘No, it’s out, I’m not going to allow it.’
However, despite the court’s admonishment, Ms. Young on behalf of the state was able to get racial issues before the jury during her closing arguments.
Mr. Parker writes, ‘Mr. Alexander’s conviction has been tainted by myriad due process violations and inescapable prejudice. The role that race, religion, and national origin played in his conviction has shaken the belief of Amici that South Asians, Middle Easterners, and other minorities can receive equal protection under the laws of this state.’
We can see these appeals in the transcript of Deputy DA Frances Young’s rebuttal closing arguments. The alleged victims are 19 girls – who are white.
Ms. Young sets the scene, noting that all of the girls described the same scene – an assault on a ‘cruddy air mattress… with dirty sheets, dirty towels, smelly t-shirts.’
She argued, ‘You know that Ferrari T-shirt that the clerk has. I don’t know if you want to do that, take a whiff of it. It’s not pleasant. It corroborates exactly what they said. He smelled. His apartment was disgusting.’
Later she added, ‘They all told you he smelled.’
As Mr. Parker points out, this is not an accident. He writes, ‘Mr. Alexander was a filthy outsider to the community, a ‘dirty’ and ‘smelly’ ‘Hindu from India,’ who read foreign Hebrew symbols ‘from right to left’…’
Mr. Alexander, from India, also has a Christian background.
Mr. Parker argued, ‘The gratuitous remarks made in Mr. Alexander’s case served no purpose other than to ‘inflame and prejudice the minds of the jurors against the defendant because he happened to be a [South Asian immigrant].’’
But perhaps more egregious, Ms. Young played on racial stereotypes as well.
She noted in her rebuttal, ‘Being a minority, I noticed that they were all white.’
She was able to work in the reference subtly, despite official judicial admonishment not to bring race into the equation.
Here the DA uses that longtime racial dog whistle, the fear of the white jurors that innocent, young, white girls or women will become the victims of a predatory person of color.
Mr. Parker argues, ‘Insinuating that a minority defendant preys upon white women is a highly inflammatory tactic that has been consistently treated as prosecutorial misconduct warranting relief.’
He notes that Florida’s high court reversed a death sentence because the prosecutor’s inquiry into the race of past victims was a ‘deliberate attempt to insinuate that appellant had a habit of preying on white women.’
Previously, courts found this to be a prejudicial error in a case where the prosecution argued that the black defendant told the white victim ‘something about white people having been taking advantage of the colored people and, of course, he wanted to get even with the white people.’
Argues Mr. Parker, ‘Statistics have shown decisively that a victim’s race can powerfully sway a jury, even to the extent that the race of a victim can play a dispositive role in whether a defendant lives or dies.’
Mr. Parker adds, ‘After portraying Mr. Alexander as a mystical and smelly foreigner, the prosecution maximized the prejudicial impact by presenting a contrast with the whiteness of the alleged victims. Beyond merely insinuating that Mr. Alexander had a preference for white women, the prosecution directly told the jury that he preyed specifically and exclusively on white women. This tactic presents a clear case of misconduct, and its prejudicial impact cannot reasonably be questioned.’
In a recent Supreme Court case, the court ruled, in reviewing the history of the state of Mississippi’s peremptory strikes in the Flowers case, that evidence ‘strongly supports the conclusion that the State’s use of peremptory strikes in Flowers’ sixth trial was motivated in substantial part by discriminatory intent.’
Indeed, the state attempted to strike all 36 black prospective jurors over the court of the first four trials – Curtis Flowers has been tried six separate times for his alleged role in the murder of four employees of a Mississippi furniture store.
Mr. Flowers is black; three of the four victims were white. The US Supreme Court ultimately found that the trial court ‘committed clear error in concluding that the State’s peremptory strike of black prospective juror Carolyn Wright was not motivated in substantial part by discriminatory intent.’
In this case, the prosecutor has improperly injected race into a trial, as Mr. Parker argues. This would tend to ‘undermine [the courts’] strong commitment to rooting out bias, no matter how subtle, indirect or veiled.’
As Patty Lopez, a former California Assemblymember noted in her letter to US Judge Dean Pregerson in January, in support of the writ of habeas corpus, the trial judge on the record stated he was ‘troubled’ with this case and ‘not happy with the way the [prosecutors] handled this case.’’
Obie Anthony, another exoneree, told the Vanguard, ‘In any case prosecutorial misconduct is egregious and in my opinion bad acting prosecutor should be held accountable, and where there are echoes of misconduct, one should want to take a look, such is the Anand Alexander case.’
There are a lot of problems with the case of Anand Jon Alexander, but appeals to racial and religious prejudice were clear and overt during his trial and need to be rectified during the post-conviction process.
—David M. Greenwald reporting

Published by
https://www.davisvanguard.org/

In 2008, Anand Jon Alexander, a rising star in the fashion design world, was convicted of multiple counts of sexual assault and received a life sentence in prison.  He is widely believed to have been wrongfully convicted of these crimes.

As his petition for commutation filed by his attorneys notes, “Mr. Alexander’s tainted trial and unreliable verdict and subsequently disproportionate prison sentence has resulted in a travesty of justice.”

In 2008, Anand Jon Alexander, a rising star in the fashion design world, was convicted of multiple counts of sexual assault and received a life sentence in prison. He is widely believed to have been wrongfully convicted of these crimes.
As his petition for commutation filed by his attorneys notes, ‘Mr. Alexander’s tainted trial and unreliable verdict and subsequently disproportionate prison sentence has resulted in a travesty of justice.’
Jeffrey Deskovic, himself an exoneree and head of the Jeffrey Deskovic Foundation, told the Vanguard, ‘Anand Jon’s case is fraught with prosecutorial misconduct and bad lawyering. It is no wonder he was wrongfully convicted.’
In a letter, Mr. Deskovic, who will be the Vanguard’s keynote speaker in a few weeks, added, ‘I have never seen a wrongful conviction case as broad and complex as this one. It’s absolutely stunning!’
Similarly, having reviewed the evidence of factual innocence that was withheld by the police for over a decade, Exoneree Obie Anthony, founder of Exoneratednation.org, and former California Assemblywoman Patty Lopez, the author of Assembly Bill 1909, described the injustice against Anand Jon Alexander as ‘one of the worst cases of police misconduct…utterly shocking…poster boy victim of 1909 violations.’
Corey Parker, Counsel for American Justice Alliance, argues in his amicus curiae brief, ‘Unless this Court rectifies this wrongful conviction, minority groups and individuals in the State of California will live in fear of being subject to such similar state-sponsored discrimination and underhanded, unconstitutional tactics by the very law enforcement tasked with protecting them.’
Appellate Attorney Julia Anna Trant adds, ‘I am convinced that Mr. Alexander’s conviction is one of the worst miscarriages of justice I have ever encountered in my work as a legal professional. While working on Mr. Alexander’s case, I could not stop being astounded by the amount of violations of Mr. Alexander’s constitutional rights, the rules of criminal procedure, and the rules of evidence.’
While there are a number of complaints, including juror misconduct, Brady violations and police misconduct, a lesser-known but serious problem with his trial was the subtle but overt and egregious appeal to racial and religious prejudice.
In pretrial motions, the defense was able to get the judge to keep race and religion out of the case. However, they kept coming back in.
For instance, in a debate over whether a book would be admitted into evidence, the defense argued that ‘the court already said we’re keeping religion out of this case.’
During voir dire, Deputy DA Young noted, ‘I thought earlier when the court ruled we wouldn’t delve into religion, it wouldn’t touch on that area, so I didn’t object to it originally, but I thought it got into the moral, religious, spiritual areas we were trying to stay from.’
The judge noted, ‘I’m not going to permit it,’ and later clarified, ‘No, it’s out, I’m not going to allow it.’
However, despite the court’s admonishment, Ms. Young on behalf of the state was able to get racial issues before the jury during her closing arguments.
Mr. Parker writes, ‘Mr. Alexander’s conviction has been tainted by myriad due process violations and inescapable prejudice. The role that race, religion, and national origin played in his conviction has shaken the belief of Amici that South Asians, Middle Easterners, and other minorities can receive equal protection under the laws of this state.’
We can see these appeals in the transcript of Deputy DA Frances Young’s rebuttal closing arguments. The alleged victims are 19 girls – who are white.
Ms. Young sets the scene, noting that all of the girls described the same scene – an assault on a ‘cruddy air mattress… with dirty sheets, dirty towels, smelly t-shirts.’
She argued, ‘You know that Ferrari T-shirt that the clerk has. I don’t know if you want to do that, take a whiff of it. It’s not pleasant. It corroborates exactly what they said. He smelled. His apartment was disgusting.’
Later she added, ‘They all told you he smelled.’
As Mr. Parker points out, this is not an accident. He writes, ‘Mr. Alexander was a filthy outsider to the community, a ‘dirty’ and ‘smelly’ ‘Hindu from India,’ who read foreign Hebrew symbols ‘from right to left’…’
Mr. Alexander, from India, also has a Christian background.
Mr. Parker argued, ‘The gratuitous remarks made in Mr. Alexander’s case served no purpose other than to ‘inflame and prejudice the minds of the jurors against the defendant because he happened to be a [South Asian immigrant].’’
But perhaps more egregious, Ms. Young played on racial stereotypes as well.
She noted in her rebuttal, ‘Being a minority, I noticed that they were all white.’
She was able to work in the reference subtly, despite official judicial admonishment not to bring race into the equation.
Here the DA uses that longtime racial dog whistle, the fear of the white jurors that innocent, young, white girls or women will become the victims of a predatory person of color.
Mr. Parker argues, ‘Insinuating that a minority defendant preys upon white women is a highly inflammatory tactic that has been consistently treated as prosecutorial misconduct warranting relief.’
He notes that Florida’s high court reversed a death sentence because the prosecutor’s inquiry into the race of past victims was a ‘deliberate attempt to insinuate that appellant had a habit of preying on white women.’
Previously, courts found this to be a prejudicial error in a case where the prosecution argued that the black defendant told the white victim ‘something about white people having been taking advantage of the colored people and, of course, he wanted to get even with the white people.’
Argues Mr. Parker, ‘Statistics have shown decisively that a victim’s race can powerfully sway a jury, even to the extent that the race of a victim can play a dispositive role in whether a defendant lives or dies.’
Mr. Parker adds, ‘After portraying Mr. Alexander as a mystical and smelly foreigner, the prosecution maximized the prejudicial impact by presenting a contrast with the whiteness of the alleged victims. Beyond merely insinuating that Mr. Alexander had a preference for white women, the prosecution directly told the jury that he preyed specifically and exclusively on white women. This tactic presents a clear case of misconduct, and its prejudicial impact cannot reasonably be questioned.’
In a recent Supreme Court case, the court ruled, in reviewing the history of the state of Mississippi’s peremptory strikes in the Flowers case, that evidence ‘strongly supports the conclusion that the State’s use of peremptory strikes in Flowers’ sixth trial was motivated in substantial part by discriminatory intent.’
Indeed, the state attempted to strike all 36 black prospective jurors over the court of the first four trials – Curtis Flowers has been tried six separate times for his alleged role in the murder of four employees of a Mississippi furniture store.
Mr. Flowers is black; three of the four victims were white. The US Supreme Court ultimately found that the trial court ‘committed clear error in concluding that the State’s peremptory strike of black prospective juror Carolyn Wright was not motivated in substantial part by discriminatory intent.’
In this case, the prosecutor has improperly injected race into a trial, as Mr. Parker argues. This would tend to ‘undermine [the courts’] strong commitment to rooting out bias, no matter how subtle, indirect or veiled.’
As Patty Lopez, a former California Assemblymember noted in her letter to US Judge Dean Pregerson in January, in support of the writ of habeas corpus, the trial judge on the record stated he was ‘troubled’ with this case and ‘not happy with the way the [prosecutors] handled this case.’’
Obie Anthony, another exoneree, told the Vanguard, ‘In any case prosecutorial misconduct is egregious and in my opinion bad acting prosecutor should be held accountable, and where there are echoes of misconduct, one should want to take a look, such is the Anand Alexander case.’
There are a lot of problems with the case of Anand Jon Alexander, but appeals to racial and religious prejudice were clear and overt during his trial and need to be rectified during the post-conviction process.
—David M. Greenwald reporting

Published by
https://www.davisvanguard.org/
Portrait of Mahatma Gandhi by Anand Jon featured at University of Southern California

Sacramento, California, April 8-10: 
The ‘Reform-A-Nation’ panel held preliminary meetings with California legislators to discuss the epidemic of wrongful convictions and its potential solutions.

Press Release

Anand Jon Education reduces prison sentence

Donate to America Justice Alliance 
Their educational scholarships also help reduce prison sentence time . 
October 17th 2018 Anand Jon Alexander, Receiving his Dean’s List level GED (Otay Mesa) while in prison and is planning to take multiple College degrees ( while waiting for his freedom)

AJ-Art-Mahatma-Gandhiji

Mahatma Gandhi Portrait – By Anand Jon

“EVEN IF YOU ARE A MINORITY OF ONE, THE TRUTH IS THE TRUTH”

Anand Jon Sanjana Jon
Anand Jon and Sanjana Jon, Brother and sister power team up for Truth, Justice and freedom Aug 18'2019
April 2019 Anand Jon painting Mahatma Gandhi portrait Projectpaint.org covered by photographer Peter Merts
Photograph by Peter Merts

California Welcomes“REFORM-A-NATION” Campaign to Reverse Wrongful Convictions and UCLA Law School’s Call to End Mass Incarceration. LOS ANGELES, CA, April 23, 2019 /24-7PressRelease/ — The California State Capitol building in Sacramento was the epicenter for the “REFORM-A-NATION” panel where preliminary meetings with the legislative teams from Governor Gavin Newsom, Senator Nancy Skinner, Senator Holly Mitchell, Assemblyman Ash Kalra, Assemblyman Reggie Jones-Sawyer, and Assistant Majority Whip Assemblyman Rob Banta discussed the epidemic of wrongful convictions and its potential solutions.Read more..

Portrait of Mahatma Gandhi by Anand Jon
This class is conducted by Project PAINT; students are working on individual projects, as well as a communal class project.

Dallas prosecutors move to dismiss all charges against Anand Jon

Anand Jon

Dallas prosecutors move to dismiss all charges against Anand JonAfter indicting (June 2007) Anand Jon on three felony counts and dragging those charges for more than a decade, the Dallas District Attorney’s Office has now dismissed ALL   charges in response to Anand Jon’s demand for immediate trial at the Dallas Court Room of the Honorable Judge Brandon Birmingham. Anand Jon has suffered 11 years of a draconian 59 years to life prison sentence and continues to hold steadfast to his innocence. There was neither physical evidence (not a single “scratch” on anyone), nor were there any percipient witnesses to corroborate any criminal conduct. Additionally, Anand Jon passed a lie detector test to further prove his innocence. In April 2007, despite finding that Anand Jon had no history of violence, he was not a flight risk, and he was not a threat to anyone, Judge Elden Fox of the Beverly Hills’ court set Anand Jon’s bail at $1.3 million dollars, which was promptly paid. However, Beverly Hills Police Department (“BHPD”) re-arrested Anand Jon during a court hearing (Jun. 12, 2007) by convincing the Dallas Police to file these Dallas charges (the same claims that had already been investigated and rejected earlier in Dec. 2006) which in turn revoked Anand Jon’s California bail and crippled his defense. Beverly Hills Police Department Det. George Elwell testified, and the L.A. prosecution assured the L.A. trial court, that they had “met their burden” and turned over everything and had run background searches on all prosecution witnesses wherein they found no criminal records or impeachment evidence whatsoever. However, at least five criminal convictions, multiple acts of moral turpitude, and impeachment involving the prosecution witnesses has since been confirmed to have existed during that time but was withheld from Anand Jon’s defense team and the trial jury. The Brady errors and subsequent prejudice is self-evident because the jury found Anand Jon “not guilty” and/or “hung” on those complainants for whom similar criminal records or impeachment were revealed to the jury. Despite providing substantial amounts of newly discovered and previously withheld evidence by the BHPD that pointed not just to Anand Jon’s factual innocence, but showed he was the victim of a conspiracy among scorned women and disgruntled business associates, the Dallas District Attorney moved to dismiss all charges against Anand Jon for “neutral” reasons without further justification. Dallas defense counsel Rajish Jose of the Beltz Law Firm noted that the Dallas prosecutor’s purported reasons to drop all three accusers and all charges are due to Mr. Alexander’s convictions in California and the “cost of transport” from California. Such excuses are absurd and if anything, an attempt to cover up the litany of transgressions by law enforcement that caused the conviction of an innocent man in the overlapping California case.Read more

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Contact: Info@AmericanJusticeAlliance.org Free Anand Jon Alexander @Change.org

 

recent news

By a Correspondent Nov 7, 2018

International Innovators Panel Takes on Case of Anand
Jon, Others

Speakers and guests, including many from the Indian American 
community, attend the International Innovators Forum Fight for
Social Justice and Human Rights on Nov. 4, 2018 in Malibu,
California.(Charley Galley/Getty Images for InternInnovators
of Justice/American Justice Alliance) Read more..

Worldwide Innovators Panel Takes on Case of Anand Jon, Others – Mehndi Simple News Bollywood Stars

Mehndisimple.com Worldwide Innovators Panel Takes on Case of Anand Jon, Others The Worldwide Innovators of Justice Discussion board and Documentary Collection was held Nov. four in Malibu, Calif., with a plethora of leaders headlining the occasion.

Just this Past Weekend, the Who’s Who of Social & Justice Activism, Entertainment, Fashion and Politics Converged in Malibu, CA for the International Innovators of Justice forum & Documentary Series 

ANGELES, CA, November 09, 2018 /24-7PressRelease/ — Just this past weekend, the who’s who of social & justice activism, entertainment, fashion and politics converged in Malibu, CA for the International Innovators of Justice Forum & documentary series to take on solving the epidemic of false allegations, police misconduct, and wrongful convictions like Jeffrey Deskovic, Bill Bastuk, and Anand Jon Alexander.

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